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Deal, state pay tribute to 9/11
0913 deal 9-11
Gov. Nathan Deal delivers remarks on the states observance Friday of the 10-year anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. - photo by Photo provided

Gov. Nathan Deal, joined by Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, Chief Justice Carol Hunstein, State Patrol Col. Mark McDonough and GEMA Director Charley English, delivered remarks Friday and held a moment of silence to memorialize the innocent lives lost during the tragic 9/11 attacks on the United States. Deal also honored those who serve our nation in uniform.

“As a result of the attacks of 9/11, nearly 3,000 people perished, not soldiers on a battlefield, but civilians,” Deal said. “Men and women who had simply gone to work that day in New York City and Arlington, Va., became victims of senseless violence.

“The tragedy would also claim the lives of many brave firemen, police officers and emergency responders. On this occasion, we recognize those who serve in our military, those who travel to dangerous places in the name of freedom and all those at work here in our nation to ensure our safety.”

Deal, this week, also ordered that all U.S. and Georgia flags on state buildings fly at half-staff. Flags were lowered Friday morning through sunset Sunday.

Remarks by the governor in remembrance of 9/11, 10 years later:

Two days from now, our nation will observe the tenth anniversary of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. On that day, four planes were hijacked and all went down, crashing into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and a field in Pennsylvania — a plane many believe was targeting the White House.

In our nation’s history, with rare exception, we have fought our battles on foreign soil.   In America’s collective conscience, we have come to associate warfare with a faraway land and places that most of us will see only on the nightly news.  We believed our oceans provided us with a blanket of security, separating us from those who wished us harm. 
9/11 changed that.  We were now facing war on our soil … the very buildings projecting our nation’s might were up in flames … Americans had been injured and killed, not in a faraway place, but here.

We quickly learned that those attacking us were like no enemy we had ever faced.  They wore no uniform.  They represented no nation or state.  In fact, they were bound by only one thing … an ideology of hatred … an evil ideology that believed it right to target innocent women and children.

As a result of the attacks of 9/11, nearly 3,000 people perished … not soldiers on a battlefield … but civilians.  Men and women who had simply gone to work that day in New York City and Arlington, Virginia became victims of senseless violence.  The tragedy would also claim the lives of many brave firemen, police officers and emergency responders.

We not only remember those lost, but also the families and friends who still mourn.

On this occasion, we recognize those who serve in our military, those who travel to dangerous places in the name of freedom and all those at work here in our nation to ensure our safety.  As a result of 9/11, to combat this new threat, our leaders created the Department of Homeland Security to help protect against new terrorist attacks.  Through the hard work of our homeland security professionals and their collaboration with our military we have averted countless attacks and protected our nation against major terrorist events for 10 years.  We are especially indebted to our military who have taken the fight to the terrorists in Afghanistan and Iraq, working even now to eradicate our enemy.